Review: The 100 Mile Diet

I recently read The 100 Mile Diet, a book about a year of local eating. I was disappointed with this book. It made local eating sound very difficulty (nearly impossible) and depressing. Also most of the recipes they featured were not vegan which is a problem for me. The biggest draw of this book is not the writing itself (which I found to be voiced in an ancient and at times out of touch way), but the movement it has inspired.

Reading this book has forced me to think much more about eating locally and consumption in general. When the concept of eating locally was first brought to my attention (Buy Local or Die anyone?) I thought it would be impossible in the Vancouver area. Sure, it is easy for someone who lives in a tropical avocado paradise to eat locally but what about those of us who live in a place where the closest thing grown locally to a pineapple is a pine cone? The book greatly surprised me with the abundance of local food available here in BC. This book has really been revolutionary in changing the local marketplace as well. Just today I read an e-mail proclaiming that the local SFU Pocket Farmer’s Market will now carry local flour (something the authors searched far and wide for). As the demand for local food grows so does the marketplace, it’s amazing. The more I learn about local foods the more enticing they become.

Go visit a farmer’s market. Make a trip to a U Pick this summer. Cook at home. Make things. Blog about them.

You might even want to live on a farm for a while. I’m certainly considering it. Check out World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms.

PS: Did you know they grow Stevia in BC? COOL!

Review: Vegan Freak

The last book read was Vegan Freak by Bob Torres and Jenna Torres (yes they are a couple and yes I think it’s adorable). I love the cover and carrying the book around was a great conversation starter (I was sad to return it to the library). As someone who has been vegan for a while (a little over a year now) most of the information was not new to me. After a while you get used to dealing with common questions and you learn how to find things you can eat. I expected the book would deal more with social ethics, something I am struggling with. For example, what to do when someone gives you a non-vegan gift and similar situations. I also disagreed with some of their advice. I do not think you should get rid of all your non-vegan things. I still have shoes with leather and will wear them until they wear out. Waste is a huge problem in North America and throwing things out only contributes to this. Also, when you give things away to people it tells people that it’s okay for them to continue to be non-vegan. I am a huge advocate for up-cycling and reuse. I would love for the world to stop abusing animals but I don’t think we should waste all the animal products currently in existence.

For new vegans this book may be very helpful and I enjoyed the comical and entertaining voice they write with. Read this book with a grain of (sea?) salt and form your own opinions. Reading vegan books if a great way to open dialogue (skytrain conversation anyone?) and promote the cause.

Will Grayson, Will Grayson

Will Grayson, Will Grayson Book Cover

I finished reading John Green’s new collaboration with David Levithan, “Will Grayson, Will Grayson”. What an excellent book. It was really an entertainment novel and by that I mean that It reads much like a movie or TV show. I found myself laughing out loud (actually) several times. In fact, I think the David Levithan bits were a bit funnier than the John Green bits. I’ll have to check out his other books. I laughed and got teary eyed a little at times, it was very well done. I wasn’t a huge fan of the ending… I think I was expecting some sort of closure (an epilogue maybe?).

“it’s like, you know how sometimes you see a really sexy baby? wait…”

If you like musical theatre, emo kids, or relationships i’m sure you will enjoy this book!

Endnote: This guy reminds me the slightest bit of Tiny Cooper. Just putting that out there.