SOCIAL justice

Sustainability is very important to me but I wonder if it comes at a cost.

I listened to this awesome lecture by¬†Charlotte Gerson, the healthy 88 year old with no doctor and no problems, thanks to her vegan diet. I totally agree with everything she talked about but it really made me wonder about a few things. Really, the only thing that goes against my beliefs are social outings. By that I mean, generally, I don’t eat out, except when with friends. I don’t use disposable cutlery/cups except at parties. I don’t go to malls, except with people. In her lecture, Charlotte says she NEVER goes out to restaurants. She NEVER does anything harmful to her body (putting bad processed substances in) and I can’t help but wonder if it is becasue she is old and doesn’t have to follow social conduct as much.

Don’t get me wrong, I love spending time with people, I just wonder if we could all be happy and healthy together without harming the planet. Can we fight for social justice and be sociable?

Review: The 100 Mile Diet

I recently read The 100 Mile Diet, a book about a year of local eating. I was disappointed with this book. It made local eating sound very difficulty (nearly impossible) and depressing. Also most of the recipes they featured were not vegan which is a problem for me. The biggest draw of this book is not the writing itself (which I found to be voiced in an ancient and at times out of touch way), but the movement it has inspired.

Reading this book has forced me to think much more about eating locally and consumption in general. When the concept of eating locally was first brought to my attention (Buy Local or Die anyone?) I thought it would be impossible in the Vancouver area. Sure, it is easy for someone who lives in a tropical avocado paradise to eat locally but what about those of us who live in a place where the closest thing grown locally to a pineapple is a pine cone? The book greatly surprised me with the abundance of local food available here in BC. This book has really been revolutionary in changing the local marketplace as well. Just today I read an e-mail proclaiming that the local SFU Pocket Farmer’s Market will now carry local flour (something the authors searched far and wide for). As the demand for local food grows so does the marketplace, it’s amazing. The more I learn about local foods the more enticing they become.

Go visit a farmer’s market. Make a trip to a U Pick this summer. Cook at home. Make things. Blog about them.

You might even want to live on a farm for a while. I’m certainly considering it. Check out World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms.

PS: Did you know they grow Stevia in BC? COOL!